CAREER

Broadcast Technicians

Overview

Salary Median (2020)

$43,570

Projected Job Growth (2019-2029)

+3.1% (slower than the average)

Most Common Level of Education

Associate's degree

Career

What Broadcast Technicians Do

Set up, operate, and maintain the electronic equipment used to acquire, edit, and transmit audio and video for radio or television programs. Control and adjust incoming and outgoing broadcast signals to regulate sound volume, signal strength, and signal clarity. Operate satellite, microwave, or other transmitter equipment to broadcast radio or television programs.

Other Job Titles Broadcast Technicians May Have

Audio Engineer, Board Operator, Broadcast Engineer, Broadcast Maintenance Engineer, Broadcast Operations Engineer, Broadcast Technician, Control Operator, Production Engineer

How Leaders Describe a Typical Day at Work

Broadcast engineer ,

Capricorn Media Consultants (my own)

I am currently semi-retired and work from home using my computers to cultivate work for my new business and that of my friend's full service production company. We both have over 25 years experience in the field and met on a shoot then decided to conspire to build our businesses together. A typical shoot requires meeting with producers, directors and talent, setting up production equipment, running cables and testing out everything. Then we work together as a team to produce the product.


Tasks & Responsibilities May Include

  • Report equipment problems, ensure that repairs are made, and make emergency repairs to equipment when necessary and possible.
  • Monitor and log transmitter readings.
  • Maintain programming logs as required by station management and the Federal Communications Commission.
  • Monitor strength, clarity, and reliability of incoming and outgoing signals and adjust equipment as necessary to maintain quality broadcasts.
  • Observe monitors and converse with station personnel to determine audio and video levels and to ascertain that programs are airing.

This page includes information from theO*NET 26.1 Databaseby the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under theCC BY 4.0license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.