Mary Ann Peters

Mary Ann Peters

CEO


The Carter Center

Atlanta, GA USA


Failure is an acceptable risk. If you are going to tackle the tough problems, you have to be prepared to fail every once in awhile.

Videos

Videos

By Roadtrip Nation

Mary Ann Peters

Highlight
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01:40
Mary Ann Peters HighlightInterview Highlight
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08:46
InterviewThe Interview
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01:18
Practical Argument Vs. Moral ArgumentWeb Exclusive
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00:41
Life Advice For Future GenerationsWeb Exclusive
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03:21
Human Rights Vs. Cultural TraditionsWeb Exclusive
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01:52
How To Deal With Gender DiscriminationWeb Exclusive
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00:37
My Definition of SuccessWeb Exclusive
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03:15
Day In The Life As The CEO Of The Carter CenterWeb Exclusive
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03:36
Day In The Life In The Foreign ServiceWeb Exclusive
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01:42
Challenges And Successes Working With The Foreign ServiceInterview Excerpt
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03:01
My Best Experience With The Carter CenterInterview Excerpt
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02:00
My Career PathInterview Excerpt
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02:00
Being A Woman In A Male-Dominated ProfessionInterview Excerpt
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Milestones

Milestones

My road in life has been direct.
Was born and raised in California.
Received her bachelor's and master’s degrees in international relations.
Says while she was not a part of the first wave of women entering diplomatic service, she knew those women and had tremendous respect for the sacrifices they made that enabled her to enter the field.
In the early ’70s, female diplomats who got married were forced to resign—she decided to join anyways and began her service in 1975 where she advocated for more women to join.
She worked for over 30 years as a career diplomat with the U.S. Department of State, serving in Canada, Germany, Bulgaria, Russia, Myanmar, Bangladesh, and many more.
She became the United States ambassador to Bangladesh in 2000 and led the embassy’s response to the war on terrorism—was awarded a Presidential Meritorious Service Award in 2003 for her work.
After retiring from foreign service, she transitioned into education, serving as dean of academics at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies and provost of the Naval War College.
She is now the executive director of The Carter Center and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and Women in International Security.
Keep following my journey
Education

Education

highschool
High School
undergrad
Bachelor
International Relations and Affairs
Santa Clara University
graduate
Graduate
International Relations and Affairs
Johns Hopkins University
certification
Certification/License
Political Science and Government, General
Institut d'Etudes Politiques
Career

Career

CEO

I am a retired American diplomat working with nonprofits to advance human rights around the world.

Career Roadmap

Roadmap
My work combines:
My work combines:
Non-Profit Organizations
Non-Profit Organizations
Government
Government
Helping People
Helping People

Day to Day

As a diplomat, I spent years traveling to different countries, living there at embassies, and working with the people of those countries to make the world a better neighborhood for all of us. I used to visit villages and oversee projects we were working on. As Executive Director, I oversee all of the projects our organization works on. It also involves meetings, fundraising, problem solving, and networking.

Skills & Qualities Beyond School

Be culturally sensitive and never underestimate people. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that just because you are in a position to help someone, that you are better than them.

Advice for Getting Started

Here's the first step for everyone

Make mistakes and learn from them. Keep learning, keep climbing, and keep giving back.

Recommended Education

My career is related to what I studied. I'd recommend the path I took:

undergrad
Bachelor
International Relations and Affairs
graduate
Graduate
International Relations and Affairs
certification
Certification/License
Political Science and Government, General
Hurdles

Hurdles

The Noise I Shed

From Peers:

"You won't get that assignment because you are a woman. "

There was a lot of negativity and caution about sending women into certain countries because of preconceived notions about how they would be welcomed (or not). In many instances, those fears were unfounded and a reflection of the biases held about the people of those countries. I just had to push forward and prove them wrong.

Challenges I Overcame

Gender Discrimination
Gender Discrimination

Starting out, I was one of very few women in foreign service and had to deal with all of the push back associated with that.