Lisa Lloyd Riggs

Lisa Lloyd Riggs

Educational Counselor


Shasta Community College

Milestones

Milestones

My road in life took a while to figure out.
When I was in high school, I thought that maybe I wanted to be a teacher.
I went to community college & took communication & public speaking classes. I loved it and was good at it.
I went to California State University, Chico, majored in communication studies, and pursued multiple internships.
I always loved going to the career center, and taking the career exploration and planning classes.
After getting my bachelor's degree in communications, I wanted to be an inspirational speaker.
Because of my internships, I found my way into an early college awareness job working with middle school students.
I read "What Color is Your Parachute?" which suggested counseling as an area of interest.
I now work as a counselor and teach one of the career planning classes I'd loved so much.
Keep following my journey
Education

Education

highschool
High School
Enterprise High School
undergrad
Bachelor
Communication, General
California State University-Chico
graduate
Graduate
Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services
University of La Verne
associates
Associate's Degree
Shasta College
Career

Career

Educational Counselor

Helping all students access academic, career and resorces for educational success.

Career Roadmap

Roadmap
My work combines:
My work combines:
Education
Education
Technology
Technology
Helping People
Helping People

Day to Day

I counsel new and returning students in course, major, career selection and support registering for classes. I also evaluate transcripts, create educational plans and proactively refer students—whether they’re students with disabilities, foster youth, previously incarcerated students, veterans, first-generation college students, etc.—to resources on-campus and in the community. I instruct career choice classes and workshops.

Skills & Qualities Beyond School

Empathy and compassion are absolutely crucial. Good customer service skills are also important - I actually learned those through a retail job I worked when I was younger. You need a desire for life-long learning: I do a lot of research on my own so I can best assist my students. I attend and coordinate workshops to help recognize and best serve students with learning disabilities or attention issues that include assistive technologies and Universal Design for Learning.

Advice for Getting Started

Here's the first step for high school students

The first step is desire. You don't have to know exactly what you want to do when you're in high school, but should definitely have a passion for helping people, or at least for the school environment. When I was in high school, I thought that maybe I wanted to be a teacher, and that maybe I'd get my AA. Getting my bachelor's degree in communications and simultaneously working in internships in the field opened the door for me to find positive work experiences that led me to pursue my master's degree in school counseling.

Recommended Education

My career is not related to what I studied. I'd recommend this path instead:

certification
Associate's Degree
undergrad
Bachelor
Communications
graduate
Graduate
Masters in School Counseling
Hurdles

Hurdles

The Noise I Shed

From Peers:

"There are 300 people applying for the job that you're applying for; what makes you think that YOU would get that job?"

I have been working since I was in the ninth grade because I always felt the need to support myself and be financially independent. So it was hard to hear that the people around me doubted my abilities, but my drive pushed me to believe that I could get the jobs I wanted to get. Later in life, I got a job that technically required a master's degree, despite only completing a bachelor's degree. That showed me that by working hard and applying myself, I could truly get any job I wanted.

Challenges I Overcame

Financial
Financial

My mother passed away when I was young, and with a single parent, it's hard to find the financial support system needed to go to college. I worked since I was in ninth grade because I wanted to be independent, and that drive benefited me long-term.

Losing Financial Aid
Losing Financial Aid

While I was in college, I lost my financial aid support. I didn't know how to navigate the system - which questions to ask, where to go on campus, etc. That struggle led to me being a counselor and helping students in the same situation.

First-Generation College Student
First-Generation College Student

My family didn't know how to encourage or advise me. I had to navigate the system alone. Not having a support system inspired me to become the person who could support students going through the same thing.