Flint Farley

Flint Farley

Mechanical Engineer


U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Milestones

My road in life took a while to figure out.
My dad was a disciplinarian and I always wanted to make him proud.
I served in the Air Force for a few years, then left. After a 15-month hiatus, I joined the Army.
I was in a helicopter accident and was medically retired from the military in 1989.
The VA told me I had to declare a major to get my school funding, so I chose mechanical engineering.
After graduating from high school, Air Force training, and college, I knew I'd made my dad proud.
I worked at Dow Corning as a packaging engineer, then worked in the automotive industry.
I didn't enjoy working in the automotive industry, so I decided to pursue teaching for a short time.
I found a job I truly loved with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; I've been there for 7 years.
Keep following my journey

Education

High School
Bachelor
Mechanical Engineering
University of Louisville
Associate's Degree
Elizabethtown Community and Technical College

Career

Mechanical Engineer

I'm a mechanical engineer overseeing contract administration for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Career Roadmap

Roadmap
My work combines:
My work combines:
Armed Services
Engineering
Building Things

Day to Day

Every day, I wake up, head to work at 7 o'clock, have a cup of coffee, and check out my calendar to see what kind of meetings or inspections I have scheduled for the day. I'm currently overseeing over 140 million dollars-worth of projects that I have to keep an eye on, so a typical day might involve overseeing the piping on an aircraft carrier, then driving 50 or 60 miles to oversee the duct work being done at a school. Then I hang up my hat at 3:30 p.m. and go home.

Skills & Qualities Beyond School

You've got to be a decent people person. You can go out there and yell and scream at your peers, but as my mother always said, "You're going to catch more flies with honey than with vinegar." If you are courteous and respectful to the people you're interacting with on a daily basis, then they're going to treat you with the same respect, and they're going to want to continue working with you.

Advice for Getting Started

Here's the first step for high school students

You have to have an interest in (if not a love for) mathematics. If you don't like math, chances are, engineering is not the field for you. I took two years of calculus and differential equations, as well as physics, so it's going to be very hard for you to get through those if you don't enjoy doing math.

Recommended Education

My career is related to what I studied. I'd recommend the path I took:

undergrad
Bachelor
Mechanical Engineering
certification
Associate's Degree

Hurdles

The Noise I Shed

From Teachers:

"You need to take things more seriously and stop being such a class clown."

Challenges I Overcame

First-Generation College Student