Andy Lee

Andy Lee

Trusts and foundations manager


Royal Mencap Society

Milestones

My road in life has taken me all over.
First year at university away from narrow-minded catholic upbringing was transformational.
Studying English in San Diego/LA, I encountered diverse groups of people, experiences, perspectives.
Post-graduation panic: a pointless unpaid internship, then a well-paid but dead-end admin job.
Plan B: Study civil engineering, the least-bad/best alternative that I was aware of at the time.
Moving to London on a study abroad year.
Staying in London to finish my second bachelors. Travelling the world.
Working in London. Travelling the world.
Changing career in London. Travelling the world.

Education

High School
Bachelor
English Language and Literature, General
University of California-Los Angeles
Bachelor
Civil Engineering, General
Kingston University

Career

Trusts and foundations manager

I write grant applications for a learning-disability charity.

Career Roadmap

Roadmap
My work combines:
My work combines:
Writing
Non-Profit Organizations
Communicating / Sharing Stories

Day to Day

Catching up on political & social policy news. Researching potential donors & formulating strategies for engaging them to support the charity's cause. Database analysis, analysing the value of applications submitted, applications rejected, donations received, forecasting prospect values over the next month, three months, and six months. Unpicking the components of projects being delivered on the ground, writing proposals, letters & applications. Drinking coffee. Eating cake. Studying economics.

Skills & Qualities Beyond School

QWERTY keyboard training is very valuable in the real world - even in 2013 - It's astonishing how few people can type with ten fingers (outside the US anyway) considering how long the keyboard's been around. Non-English languages are very useful too. Any language(s) depending on where your interests lie.

Advice for Getting Started

Here's the first step for professionals

I fell into this mostly by accident. But that doesn't help, so probably: Make a realistic appraisal of your skills and experience so far and how you can apply/transfer them to the new area. Be brutally honest with yourself, especially with your shortcomings, to be able to assess what are the actual steps you need to take. Know the limits you're trying to breach-and all that guff.

Recommended Education

My career is not related to what I studied. I'd recommend this path instead:

undergrad
Bachelor
English, Civil Engineering

Hurdles

The Noise I Shed

From Myself:

"Everything everyone else has heard too."