Roadtrip Nation
Elizabeth Yeampierre

Elizabeth Yeampierre

Executive Director


UPROSE

Brooklyn, NY USA


For me, it’s not a job—it’s a life. I’m fighting for the seventh generation yet unborn.

Videos

By Roadtrip Nation

Elizabeth Yeampierre

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01:34
Elizabeth Yeampierre Highlight
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06:29
Interview
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01:53
My Career Path
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02:48
Building The Confidence To Stand Up For What You Believe In
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01:47
Working At The Intersection Of Racial Justice And Climate Change
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03:00
We Create More Impact With An Intergenerational Focus
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01:29
Ancestral Knowledge Is Important In Addressing Climate Change
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01:25
Taking Pride In My Roots
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03:18
Advice For Young People Wanting To Join The Climate Justice Movement
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02:30
Decolonizing The Way We Think About Leadership
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01:35
What Is Energy Democracy
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Turning Political Roadblocks Into Organizing Opportunities

Milestones

My road in life took a while to figure out.
I was born and raised in New York City.
I earned my bachelor’s degree in political science and then went on to earn my law degree.
After graduating, I started building my law career as an attorney.
As a civil rights lawyer, I was organizing against police misconduct when I felt called to join UPROSE and help the environmental justice movement.
I currently lead the mission at UPROSE as the executive director.
In addition to my work with UPROSE, I’m also the co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance.
Keep following my journey

Education

High School
Bachelor
Political Science
Fordham University
Doctorate
Law
Northeastern University School of Law

Career

Executive Director

I work at the intersection of racial justice and climate change.

Career Roadmap

Roadmap
My work combines:
My work combines:
Non-Profit Organizations
Environment & Nature
Helping People

Advice for Getting Started

Here's the first step for everyone

If you're wanting to get into the climate justice and sustainability movement, I recommend starting by reading the Jemez Principles of Democratic Organizing. Do research on the work that is being done by organizations in this field across the country. Refrain from wanting to create a new organization. Instead, find out what people are already doing in the community and see how you can add value and complement the work that is already being done.

Hurdles

The Noise I Shed

From Peers:

"You probably didn't do well on the LSAT."

Interviewed By

Empowered State

Empowered State

The state of New York leads a clean energy revolution